QuickTimeVR

Object movie

2.0M

19.0M

QuickTimeVR

Panorama movie

500K

QuickTimeVR

Panorama movie

500K

QuickTimeVR

Panorama movie

500K

Still image

Reconstruction view

320 x 240

640 x 480

1250 x 900

Still image

Reconstruction view

320 x 240

640 x 480

1250 x 900

Still image

Reconstruction view

320 x 240

640 x 480

1250 x 900

Still image

Reconstruction view

320 x 240

640 x 480

1250 x 900

Still image

Reconstruction view

320 x 240

640 x 480

1250 x 900

Still image

Reconstruction view

320 x 240

640 x 480

1250 x 900

Still image

Reconstruction view

320 x 240

640 x 480

1250 x 900

Still image

View from Basilica Aemilia

320 x 240

640 x 480

1250 x 900

Arcus Augusti
Triumphal arch honoring the Emperor Augustus
Reconstructed state: Building as first dedicated on site

Reconstruction issues

Alternate Representations of the Facade

Scientific committee member, C. Giuliani, supported a reconstruction based on a representation of the arch on a Roman coin minted in 29 BC (see Claridge, p. 99, fig. 35). The coin depicts a three-part triumphal arch.

 (Level of certainty: medium)

Building Internal Connecting Elements

This is one of the most contentious monuments on the Forum Romanum. Not only are scholars in disagreement about the location, those that agree on the location rarely agree on the foundation remains that should be considered part of the monument. In situ there are four sections of foundation that add to controversy because of their differences in material, construction and modifications. Scientific Committee member C. Giuliani has examined the foundations and found that the two central foundations thought to be from the Arch of Augustus are massive enough to support the central arch and were constructed in an integrated manner at the same time. This is not the case with the foundations thought to support the side arches. The southernmost foundation is shallow and of different construction than the central foundations. The northernmost foundation is of a third type of construction, possibly indicating a third phase of construction and is also structurally independent from the other two foundations.

 (Level of certainty: medium)

Building a Hypothetical Second Level

C. Giuliani notes that because of the quarrying and lime kilns located in the Forum during later phases, loose architectural fragments were constantly moved about the area and vicinity. Therefore, pieces found on site but without a clear context could conceivably be from buildings located well outside the boundaries of the Forum proper.

 (Level of certainty: medium)

Original construction methods

Overall construction (Level of certainty: low)

1 Foundation (Level of certainty: high)

Concrete rubble core, tufa; see section on physical evidence.

2 Fašade-main (Level of certainty: high)

2.1 Fabric of building (Level of certainty: high)

Brick with concrete and rubble infill

2.2 Surface covering (Level of certainty: high)

Ashlar patterned marble panels, white color

2.3 Decorative elements (Level of certainty: medium)

Specific details of the building were reconstructed based on the component pieces used by Iopolo (column capital, moulding elements). All other decorative elements were destroyed and have been reconstructed on the basis of Roman architectural norms.

3 Façade-side 2 (Level of certainty: high)

See façade-main

4 Façade-side 3 (Level of certainty: high)

See façade-main

5 Façade-side 4 (Level of certainty: high)

See façade-main

6 Floor (Level of certainty: high)

6.1 Bedding (Level of certainty: high)

Mortar on concrete

6.2 Pavement (Level of certainty: high)

Basalt pavers

7 Upper-level (Level of certainty: high)

7.1 Coffering (Level of certainty: high)

Reconstruction of marble coffers is based on Roman architectural norms.

8 Roof (Level of certainty: high)

Marble panels