QuickTimeVR

Object movie

2.0M

23.0M

QuickTimeVR

Panorama movie

500K

QuickTimeVR

Panorama movie

500K

QuickTimeVR

Panorama movie

500K

Still image

Reconstruction view

320 x 240

640 x 480

1250 x 900

Still image

Reconstruction view

320 x 240

640 x 480

1250 x 900

Still image

Reconstruction view

320 x 240

640 x 480

1250 x 900

Still image

Reconstruction view

320 x 240

640 x 480

1250 x 900

Still image

Reconstruction view

320 x 240

640 x 480

1250 x 900

Still image

View from Basilica Aemilia

320 x 240

640 x 480

1250 x 900

Regia
A shrine sometimes called by the sources the home of the king, the rex sacrificulus, or the pontifex maximus.
Reconstructed state: Building as first dedicated on site

Reconstruction issues

Building a Hypothetical Second Level

Much of the architectural detail and building finishes are based on architectural pieces found in and around the site. Because of the intense quarrying and kiln activities in the area, the source of these architectural remains is questionable.

 (Level of certainty: high)

Reconstruction Issues

The northern walls of the Regia and the Temple of Julius Caesar are often reconstructed with a linking portico. This reconstruction can be accommodated in the current scheme, though it is not included in the reconstruction by Scientific Committee member R. Scott, see also Scott (1993).

 (Level of certainty: medium)

Roofing Solution

Scientific committee member R. Scott notes that the roofed portion of the Regia covers the greatest possible area with a rectangular roof of the oddly shaped site (defined by the paths around it); the trapezoidal courtyard utilizes the remaining space. Because of the importance of the roof in the definition of the building and precinct, R. Scott concentrated on roof details such as the crowning decorations and antefixes.

 (Level of certainty: medium)

Sources for Reconstruction

Scientific Committee member Russell Scott provided archaeological drawings, reconstruction plan elevation and section drawings derived from the excavations of Frank Brown and Russell Scott.

 (Level of certainty: medium)

Original construction methods

Overall construction (Level of certainty: high)

1 Foundation (Level of certainty: high)

Concrete rubble core, tufa and brick faced.

10 Roof (Level of certainty: high)

Clay tile

2 Fašade-main (Level of certainty: high)

2.1 Fabric of building (Level of certainty: high)

Brick with rubble infill

2.2 Surface covering (Level of certainty: high)

Ashlar pattern plaster work (with embedded marble chips) with crisp beveled, white color

2.3 Decorative elements (Level of certainty: high)

Stone marble architrave below eave, door surround, bases are all hypothetical. No decorative elements from the reconstructed phase were found in-situ and few were found on site. Most decorative elements were destroyed and have been reconstructed on the basis of Roman architectural norms.

3 Façade-side 2 (Level of certainty: high)

See main façade

4 Façade-side 3 (Level of certainty: high)

See main façade

5 Façade-side 4 (Level of certainty: high)

See main façade

6 Floor (Level of certainty: high)

6.1 Bedding (Level of certainty: high)

Mortar on concrete

6.2 Pavement (Level of certainty: high)

Pavement is constructed of marbles of neutral color.

7 Doorway(s) (Level of certainty: high)

Marble surround frame; bronze doors. Main door is preserved at the church of San Giovanni in Laterano

8 Main level (Level of certainty: high)

8.1 Wall (Level of certainty: high)

Marble panels over brick stricture fixed with mortar

8.2 Base Moulding (Level of certainty: high)

White marble at lower level

8.3 Surface cover (Level of certainty: high)

Wall finishes are unknown and represented by a neutral color palette. Patterns are based on contemporary designs.

8.4 Decorative elements (Level of certainty: high)

Interior decorative elements are reconstructed based on common contemporary patterns

8.5 Window(s) (Level of certainty: high)

Bronze grid frames of common Roman design

9 Ceiling (Level of certainty: high)

9.1 Coffering (Level of certainty: high)

Reconstruction: gilded wood coffers based on Roman architectural norms

9.2 Rafters (Level of certainty: high)

Simple wood truss